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Gardening jobs for September

    

Event details

This event begins 09/01/2021 and repeats every year forever

September is generally a cooler, gustier month than August and the days are noticeably shorter. While there's not as much to do in the ornamental garden at this time of the year, if you have a fruit or vegetable patch, you'll be busy reaping the rewards of harvest. It's also time to get out and start planting spring-flowering bulbs for next year and you can collect seeds for next summer's colour too. Make the most of the remaining warmth while you can!


This month's main gardening jobs are:

  1. Divide herbaceous perennials

  2. Pick autumn raspberries

  3. Collect and sow seed from perennials and hardy annuals

 

Here are some more jobs and reminders for September as circulated by the RHS...

  • Divide herbaceous perennials

  • Pick autumn raspberries

  • Collect and sow seed from perennials and hardy annuals

  • Dig up remaining potatoes before slug damage spoils them

  • Net ponds before leaf fall gets underway

  • Keep up with watering of new plants, using rain or grey water if possible

  • Start to reduce the frequency of houseplant watering

  • Clean out cold frames and greenhouses so that they are ready for use in the autumn

  • Cover leafy vegetable crops with bird-proof netting

  • Plant spring flowering bulbs

 

Please visit the RHS website for more detailed guidance on each of this month's jobs above, plus much more.

Also highly recommended is the excellent Gardening Know How (September) section at Sutton's Seeds website, for more great gardening tips and advice!

Cover Photo from Pixabay


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